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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 75 (some duplicates have been removed)
>> right now, the european union is in distress. what would a failed euro mean for the e.u. or for its largest trading partner, the u.s.? >> the '08/'09 financial panic/crash/great recession put tremendous economic financial pressure on the entire global economy, including europe. >> in the same way in which the collapse of lehman implied global shocks, a dissolve in the situation of the eurozone is going to impact the united states. >> while everyone is telling the germans, "bail these guys out now," the germans are saying, "if we're gonna bail them out, we wanna fix the political crisis." >> at the end of the day, europe and the eurozone face an existential question: can we become the united states of europe? >> in a democracy, agreement is not essential, but participation is. >> never before in our history have we been so interconnected with the rest of the world. >> foreign policy is actually not foreign. >> america has faced great hardship before and each time we have risen to the challenge. >> the ultimate test is to move our society from where it is to where it has
with the ecb to make sure that the euro got through this problem. i was designated to ask you about the banking union. and at that point he was there optimistic. he thought the banking union could be worked on, in place in the first quarter of this year. well, now they've moved it to the first quarter hopefully in 2014 and you still have argument somehow it is going to be done. so you need to put a timeline on this and then you've got to adhere to it. but to get the banking system back with similar regulations throughout the eurozone is absolutelabsolutel absolutely necessary. it is key to the recovery of your. second of all is a plan that he talked about on july 26 in london last year. which is the outright monetary transaction, whereas the ecb would buy bonds from the country's in trouble, along with the european stability mechanism under certain conditions. in other words, certain conditionality. now, the ecb is going to put up that conditionality. they have enough on there. and so it will probably be international monetary fund, but they haven't really agreed what kind of conditionality the
stronger than expected. it rose in january, current conditions 108 versus the expectations of 107. euro/dollar is about 1% higher on the back of that news. the ifo institute, current conditions, 108. headline index, 104.2 versus 103. ross, what do you make of it? >> well, you can see what's going on with the euro there, 134. let's get more from finland. good to see you, alex. thanks indeed for joining us. the defense here that we're no longer in crisis fighting mode, the question as we look at data in germany, the question is whether we've made a fundamental turn, a fundamental change and whether things are temporary. >> i certainly hope we've made a fundamental turn. if this crisis is 100 steps, i'd say we are about 60 steps down the road. now, really, we have the fundamental institutional things in place. so that has calmed down the markets. what we now need is political stability. i think the italian election is one thing and the second thing we need in europe more than anything else is -- >> yeah. we thought stabilizing the crisis in terms of the bond spreads playing out was hard. g
the european politicians and believing in the euro project, are you? >> well, i was. breaking up, wouldn't be here -- >> you're going to tell me that you're convicted on the aussie/dollar. >> no, i'm not convicted. i'm admitting that i've been wrong. we think aussie is terribly overvalued and that's the problem, frankly. >> good to have you on. plenty more to come from you. the ecb is going to keep its interest rates at a record low today. that's what we expect, anyway. the markets will be listening to the delivery tone of mario draghi's delivery. silvia wadhwa is back at her delivery post. 2013 [ speaking foreign language ]. >> everything is going to stay the same. the ecb hasn't got anything to do right now. they've pretty much said everything on track, probably the best, cheapest intervention they had so far was the program. every month announced again. we stand ready to act, but so far they haven't had to do anything because nobody has asked for an omt program yet. but the market believes that the ecb is there as the backstop. so far, that was very successful. in terms of anything el
of the most indebted regions asking madrid for more than nine million euros. >>> roche strides lower after posting solid earnings on strong sales of its cancer medicine. analysts warn about the loss of exclusive rights to a key chemotherapy drug. >>> game over for super mario and friend to turn a profit. nintendo unexpectedly swings to its full-year forecast to a loss showing a poor uptake for its wii u consoles. >>> see you in september. australia's prime minister sets a surprise election date saying it will create certainty for business. >>> okay. welcome to today's program. and you know, we spent all that time waiting for five. today it's about the ten. >> how long did it take you to come up with that? >> about ten seconds ago. >> very good. we're talking about mobile phones. >> yeah. >> do you think people can guess we're talking about the iphone 5. you're waiting for 5. >> you'll about the 10, ladies and gentlemen, blackberry 10. is it the rim lazarus move? >> we saw stocks get whacked yesterday. >>> in corporate news, a couple of things to keep an eye on in markets. the italian oil c
for the river and an island for the city. >> 1 trillion euros -- that's roughly how much the eu countries lose every year to tax evasion. brussels is not amused, not least because the euro crisis is far from over. now europe is looking f ways to more effectively track down and penalize tax dodgers. in italy, tax collecting is done by the finance police, the guardia de finanza. employees often used dubious methods when chasing down tax defaulters. the tax collectors work on commission. the more people they catch, the better for them. that is putting pressure on ordinary italians, especially sml and medium-ze cpani. >> it was a spectacular protest against italy's new tax laws. the owner of a small beach bar scaled the dome of st. peter's basilica in rome and stayed put for some 24 hours. when he climbed back down, he was greeted by a cheering crowd. [applause] >> i really hope this tax issue is resolved soon and our small businesses as well as the whole economy can pick up again, at least a little. >> the tax measures by italy's technocrat government under the prime minister are another weapon i
/dollar, 11.6236. euro/dollar, 1.3166. kind of where we were yesterday. asian markets in china and japan will be catching up on news on the u.s. fiscal cliff deal. we'll get december sales figures from japan's retailing. the owner of stores are set to release its q1 earnings today. samsung electronics is expected to post its q4 earnings guidance. that's all on the agenda in asia. but what investors are to do with what we've got so far this year? joining us now, nicholas. these are the classic risk off day yesterday. how do you categorize it and what it means for -- >> well, i mean, obviously, you know, i think it's important to be clear that this was a rally not based -- based not on what the deal did, but what the deal undid. clearly, the good news is that the u.s. americansfully avoided an even bigger fiscal issue. but, you know, i think clearly it shows how low we've actually sunk in the realm of investors expectations when the markets are actually rallying on essentially muddling through. and this is a well trodden path. it's a fairly familiar tale. and we've obviously seen it in the
euros in debt. the treasury's funding this year is being outlined in madrid as we speak. as we get details on that, we'll absolutely bring them to you. we're talking about nations showing up and saying, give us the help. but spain hasn't even had to go that far. >> the spanish base can get some of on their money if they declare official emergencies. what they're trying to do is to avoid saying we really need the help, we're in trouble. all these countries, as the situation continues, it's clear they won't appear to be the only ones to call the situation off. and the spanish are aware of the fact that everyone else is aware of. we can deal with these countries. spain itself is a significantly different issue. this is a european problem, a potentially fatal one, but one that the spanish isn't really up to. >> can we still get beyond the german elections before there is any activation of the omc? >> we're talking about -- >> or can we go everywhere? >> the issue with the omt, if you're a central banker's performance, it's all these acronyms and different names. it's worth bearing in m
markets in europe. perhaps we're seeing a special case of that in europe. >> do you expect the euro to remain weak for the rest of the year? >> i expect the eurozone crisis to remain weak. people will look carefully at special situations across europe. >> and best performer of 2013? >> it's impossible to tell. let's say the whole of the market. >> very diplomatic answer there. david simple sop, thank you very much for coming by. some hopeful signs there. straight ahead on the program, talking of hopeful signs, our next guest is at u.s. oil production not seen since the 50s. what does it mean? we'll explore that when we come back. . >>> welcome back to "worldwide exchange." these are your headlines. the bank of japan steps up its easing agenda under heavy government pressure, doubling its inflation target and promising open ended qe starting next year. >>> president obama lays out a vision for his second term in his innagul address. >>> and this is the face of the new mr. euro. earlier, we had a nine to one ratio of decliner toes advancers.inaugural. earlier, we had a nine to one rat
this morning been up to 89.35. euro/yen higher, stipulating around the 118 mark, as well. euro/dollar had big moves yesterday, posting with the spanish auction mr. draghi and the ecb coming out saying it was unanimous about no interest rate cuts whereas in the previous month there had been some discussion about that. euro/dollar, 11.3260. let's bring you up to speed with the asian trading session today as they wrap up the week. li sixuan joins us for the first time today. >> thanks, ross. japan was a clear outperformer after shinzo abe unveiled his massive stimulus plan. and the nikkei gained 1.4% today. just to put it into context, this index is up for the ninth straight week, its longest winning streak since late 1988. shares of stocks surged to nearly 5% after the operator of clothing chain unicore raised its full year guidance. but hotter than expected cpi data from china put new pressure on the shanghai deposit. there will be more curbs to taint housing prices. meanwhile, weakness in china's blue chips dropped the hang seng lower. but hsbc did lend some support after the bank said yester
've been up to 89.67. euro/yen, up if you recall, 1119.34 is where we stand at the moment. euro/dollar, 11.335 55, holding on to the gains that we have seen on that particular cross rates. we have industrial production coming out in under an hour's time. that's where we trade right in and out in europe. let bring you the first update of the day from asia. li sixuan is out of singapore. >> hi. thank you, ross. asian markets mostly in the green today. and the outperformer is still china's shanghai composite hitting a seven-month high. this after security regulators said beijing can't miss the quota for investment markets. if you recall, late last week, a top official tr china's signal said growth could come in at 7.7. surpassing beijing's target of 7.5%. sen second mainland stocks finished with .64%. over 15% after profit warnings. and the market is out of action today celebrating the coming of age day. mon tar policy does have an impact on the yen today. the japanese currency soft.ed to a the 1/2 year low against the greenback. we'll see how that market reacts when it comes back online tomo
. >> good to see you today. this survey up to multi month high necessary all four of the largest euro area countries, just in the rate of decline, easing in france, easing in spain, situation stabilizing in germany. what does that mean for investors? >> we get two flashes, we get the flash and the final. so not only are we getting an indication of the progression month to month, but we're getting this sort of update. so the market feels they have momentum. since july, really, it's the commitment from mario draghi to do whatever it takes to save the eurozone. the uncertainty that dominated the fist part of 2012 was all about what happens if the currency situation collapses. i think this positive momentum that we've begun to see in all the major indices, which is when i will they're showing below 50, this shows confidence is returning in both the manufacturing and services sector across the larger economy. it's telling us that the directional bias is the more positive one. people are committing further out in terms of their own anticipation expectations. so the detail, if you dig down into i
european partners with his euro skeptics commons. now, he is making a final grand gesture. >> watching televised images of amnestied convicts leaving prison as free citizens. the same people he says are responsible for his losing everything he worked so hard for. now he will be in debt for the rest of his life. >> i will tell you quite openly and with some bitterness i'm no friend of amnesty's like this. it is a sweeping amnesty that is not just affect small-time hoods. at least 120 really big fish who have thousands of victims. >> in the late 1990's, he had a house bill. he paid some 100,000 euros but only got a bear shell. the managers took the money out of the construction company and let it go bankrupt. he had to sink another $100,000 into finishing the house. but that was not all. he feels cheated by the bankruptcy trustee who required him to pay another $100,000 to free the house from bankruptcy. that ruined him. >> i have to come up with some 100,000 euros for the house every month. those are the installments i have to pay for another 15 or 20 years with interest on top. so ther
yielding 1.5%. as far as currency markets, the euro/dollar at 1.3277. couldn't sustain it over 1.34. some comments saying the euro exchange rate is dangerously high. stepping down, as head of the euro group. they'll decide the success on january 21. dollar/yen, 87.88. and aussie dollar is over 1.0540. we'll bring you up to date with events in asia. we have more from singapore. >> sure, thank you. those asian markets finished in the red. the nikkei suffered its worst daily showing in eight months despite upbeat machinery orders data for november. a rebound in the yen fueled profit-taking in exporters. shares of al nippon airways slipped 1.6% today. and some boeing suppliers such as the battery maker gu uasa tumbled. the shanghai composite pulled back .7% after hitting a 7.5-month high yesterday. developers continued to lose ground after strong gains since q4 last year. this despite talk of delaying the property tax reform due to insufficient planning and law making. >>> in hong kong all eyes on the chief executive's maiden policy speech with a focus on measures to tackle the housing crisis
news, we'll get to that. reaction to the economics in the euro, as you were. >> a reminder, europe can be somewhat close to zero this year, output same as last year, maybe down if we get a decent follow in from the states, maybe clawing back to zero. with the gap between the two, the divergence is the greatest that i've seen since the start of the euro in the '90s. so this is not improving. >> economic divergence is great. market performance is something entirely different. >> yeah. money has to go somewhere. investors, investors around the world are looking for yield. the u.s. investors are looking for yield most of all. they sell the dollar, they buy stuff with yield. this morning, if -- if italian government debt has more yield than other things, then apparently that's just the job. so the euro is likely to go up to 1.34 against the dollar in this move. dollar/yen higher, equities higher. a risk on morning without anybody overthinking it. >> exactly. with the yields being slightly lower than they were this morning as part of that move. the house of representatives passing a bill lat
higher on the bund yields. sannish yields back over the 5% mark. on the currency markets, euro/dollar is at 1.3361. dollar/yen pulling away from its nine-month highs at 88.70th at the moment, as well. that's where we stand in europe. sixuan has more for us from singapore in the asian session. >> sure. thank you, ross. asian markets were a bit of a mixed bag. the shanghai composite gained .6% after yesterday's 3% job. since then, numbers were boosted by china's top security official who said beijing could lift the quota for investors to invest in the mainland markets by as much as nine times. environmental stocks surged. aerospace stock took off on an upbeat industry outlook. the hang seng finished marginally in the red. oil majors and telcos were the market laggers. persisting weakness in the yen boosted exporters. meanwhile, in technology shares wait on south korea kospi ending lower with 1.2%. in australia, the asx 200 ended just a touch below the line. miners were weaker. more on that from our guest later in the show. back to you, ross. >> thanks for that, swish won. catch y
. on the currency markets, a bit on profit taking setting in there. we're now at 97.69. euro/dollar, we hit just below 1.30 on friday. we keep our eyes on those markets. meanwhile, the italian legend could be set for another twist after sylvia berlusconi's party announced it was close to announcing an alliance with the northern league which would mean that democrats let by pasani would be denied a majority of the senate and that would force them to make their own alliance. this after the weekend suggests monti would come third in the election with up to 15% of the vote. let's move back down to the desk and continue our discussion. we saw the declining yields since berlusconi left. well over 8%, actually. and now we're just at over 4%. how much is the fact that we may get an undecided election, what will that do for sentiment around italy? >> i agree that the risks to the rally we've seen in italian income. i think the biggest risks in the short-term are political risks. in the end, i think the election situation in italy is staying pretty much as we expected. we expect any party would achieve an
% of those surveyed would prefer the uk to leave the euro. >> i should have said leave the european union. britain can't leave that monetary issue. we'll have plenty more on the relationship between britain and europe. for now, we can look at the relationship with markets. the euro stoxx 6700 is down about 0.4% today. not a done of differentiation. the biggest gainer, interestingly, is monti paschi. some of the airlines are struggling, too, on the back of ryan air's results. now take a look at what's happening across the bourses. we're seeing somewhat again of a trading pattern here after the last several trading sessions where it's not consistent. we'll get those up for you just as soon as we can. today, it's down pretty much across the board. the ibex shedding 0.12%. the cac 400.15% the. the xetra dax is also down 0.1%. the ftse 1100, same thing. pretty consistent story across these indexes here. it's a big week for earnings, too. in the meantime, let's take a look at the bond wall. it's been interesting, actually, to see the lack of action, lack of attention markets have been paying he
. >> japan is facing a $255 million euro loss for philips. >>> cutting a key interest rate by 25 basis point is the bank of india. >>> and the boj is keeping tune rate until there's a significant drop in unloimt. >>> and ahead of today's parliamentary hearing, italy's economic mip sister takes grilli takes center stage. >>> all right. reunited. back together. >> so nice. >> you know that song? >> i sang that to you the last time. we've had a couple of reunions and a series of time spent apart. >> how are things sthp. >> they are great here. how was davos? >> so far, gone, in the distant memory. don't worry about it for another year. plenty to worry about today, though. >> korea. >> on today's show, plenty of good stuff coming up. we're going to be in madrid as the prime minister is reportedly releasing a plan to relief some of the pain of austerity. >> then it's south korean steel giant posco reporting quarterly earnings today. we'll have the latest live from seoul at 10:15. and it's day one of the fomc meeting. economists are awaiting more clues from the stimulus program. we'll be live in n
. will israel bomb iran and will the euro zone finally break apart? >>> then the fiscal cliff. the view from across the pond. how did our political process look from a perch overseas and what will it all mean for the u.s. economy and the global economy? >>> also, will this be india's awakening? the nation confronts its own dark corners after a despicable deadly act. i'll look at some parallels with america's recent tragic school shooting. >>> first, here's my take. the deal to avoid the fiscal cliff is a small victory for sanity, but what it says about the future is somewhat bleak. washington will probably lurch from crisis to crisis kicking problems forward and placing band aids small solutions on those it does address. there will likely be no large-scale initiative on entitlement reform, energy policy, probably even immigration reform and this is the real worry. because beyond the self-inflicted crisis of the cliff and the forthcoming debt ceiling, the united states faces a much deeper challenge. for more than a decade now, for many decades by some measures, america's growth rates have slo
. on the currency markets, euro/dollar, the euro has been up to 30-month highs against the swiss franc. trying to crawl back some gains. dollar/yen, 88.84. today the yen is a little weaker today on japanese reports minister's saying he was regretful his comments will be misinterpreted. aussie/dollar, 1.0517. we begin to focus on what's going on in rio. let's bring you up to speed with the rest of the news out of asia. li sixuan joins us for the first time out of singapore. >> thank you, ross. asian markets finished on a difficult note. the shanghai composite lost about 1% today, extending losses for the second day after krit swiss downgraded china life. the hang seng ending lower by a touch. no curbs were introduced by the executive yesterday. taiwan's taex is down over 1% led by technology shares. tsmc shares ended a touch higher before its results of announce wantme wantments. it posted a 32% jump meeting forecasts. but the company expects q1 revenue to fall due to seasonal factors. elsewhere, the nikkei is finished just a tap higher. sharp shares jumped over 7% on the back of tv joint ventu
policy response generally to the european union, the euro project, i should say. we have the euro group separately meeting. we have this little issue of cypress. in terms of gdp, it's little. politically, though, it could be much more significant. tie this altogether for us. how important is an essential change of power in germany to these continued effort to resolve the crisis in cypress or other member states? >> i think the key issue is that germany is a big importer from spain, italy and the periphery. if the german numbers weaken, we'll see that later in a periphery. >> especially through spain. >> ultimately, this is really an economic story. the periphery are a lagging indicator of what's going on in germany. my concern is sooner or later, these peripheral equity may start to be under pressure again. what are your positions on debt? >> i think at this stage we're still comfortable with the core. the reason, there's probably another risk off take his. whatever the reason behind it, it tends to protect the periphery, not the core. for example, france continues to perform very, very
equities at a five-year high, the euro rallying so prices being lifted by this different influences. melissa: thanks for coming on. we have another truth even if it is not what you want to hear. he made it sound good even though it is bad news. lori: anybody can understand behind the price target. that is a given. it makes it a little bit easier to digest. melissa: it still does not ease how much you're paying at the pump. facebook fourth-quarter peak district of the downgrades roll in. if the company's strategy working? lori: and the drugmakers, the big pharma names. stocks getting beaten down. and competition from generic. but there is still reason to be optimistic. next. . ... melissa: time for stocks now as we do every 15 minutes. let's head to the floor of the new york stock exchange and our own nicole petallides. what have you got. >> i'm looking at a market here that has been somewhat mixed. nasdaq is managing to squeeze out gains the dow dropped below 13,900. some names names weighing on the dow, united health care, bank of america. market breadth actually as i look at it, a
, disappointing industrial production numbers in spain and the uk. but the euro is at a nine-month high this morning. we begin with the s&p, a five-year high. a lot riding on bank earnings. the report's not perfect. american express joining the list of financials that are cutting jobs. >>> best buy's troubles continue. they're not the only retailer under pressure this morning. jcpenney capping a bad week. >>> boeing under official view as a probe is taken on the plane. a cracked inshield and oil leak. >>> remember a cheaper iphone? a top apple executive said forget it. the company continues to focus on china. >>> we'll kick off with wells fargo, kicking off q4 results. the lending business came in a little bit lower than many analysts expecting. the numbers coming out after american express announced plans to cut 5,400 jobs and the s&p closed at fresh five-year highs. jim, it's been said, wfc, probably the most important report of the week. what kind of grade do we give it? >> the whisper was they weren't going to do this anyway. i don't know anyone would think they would -- people were
is basically a crisis connected to the governments of the euro system that has hit some countries for some reasons. somewhat we were hit because of the sins of our past. we have been having -- we have had a relatively a sizable but stable debt for a long time, but the point is it's very manageable. we are reducing it pretty fast, very fast indeed, and also to reassure the investors if you put together the net household wealth of italians as compared to the debt of the government and the companies the ratio is three to one, so it's a matter of redistribution somehow. italians thanks to god are a wealtdy people and the matter is how we can put things into order in our household but definitely italy is a major stable solid economy, and once -- already there are signs of strong improvement. once this crisis is over we will definitely flex the muscles. please. >> [inaudible] are you planning show case any important architects and designers in this year of italian culture? >> definitely. i mean in san francisco there's a wonderful san francisco design week, so we will have an italian design
development, and them you've got drawing a line in the sand doing whatever it takes to defend the euro, and to me, that was a game changer. not too many game change everies, but when he said that over the summer, hey, think about putting money to work in italian bonds. they have attractive yields particularly relative to treasuries, and poland, it's got an attractive yield, a strong currency out there. not as attractive as italy right now, but there's money allocated to it. david: jack, when you talk about italy, poland, and mexican bonds, i used to cover mexico in the 80s, and 90s, and i remember defaults there. to me, it sounds more like junk bonds than fixed income? >> well, you know, i make the comment that, you know, they are not your father's emerging markets. there's been a huge development over the last ten years or so in the the developing world right now, and mexico is a classic example of that. david: i have to challenge you, jack. >> sure. david: mexico had terrible crisis with the drug war, and that eventually effects investments in mexico of the there's a lot of developme
, the euro, we should note, is hitting 11-month highs against the u.s. dollar. marginal changes on a percentage basis. a road map this morning starts off with apple. even more doubts about the demand for the iphone 5 sending shares below. >> did you see your paycheck on friday? the payroll tax hike obviously kicking in for many americans. felt like a pay cut. will this be a temporary shock or a headwind as stocks hover at five-year highs. >> ubs achoirs tnt after a commission throws up road blocks. >>> to the top story. in the pre-market, we've seen apple shares fall below $500 for the first time in 11 months. the tech giant has cut its orders for iphone 5 components because of weaker than expected demands. screen orders for january to march quarter have fallen about half. the company had planned to order. apple said to cut orders for components other than screens. now, jim, we've had sort of this concern about demand for the iphone 5. i think last week when deutsche bank came out with the note from the japanese team, specifically citing this very issue, that's when the concerns
worried about the euro, the fiscal cliff, saw it as a safe currency. with the rest of the world stabilizing everyone's looking at the u.k.'s underlying fundamentals, no growth, lack of competitiveness, banks talking about weaker sterling. sterling looks vulnerable. >> what happens with the government's finances? the ocd's come out said public spending for 2012, 49% of gdp. it was 49.6% 2011. it was supposed to go down, it went up. >> the gdp numbers were much weaker than expected. we thought there would be a decent recovery in activity. it's than public spending overshot, it's that gdp has undershot. from the ratio point of view you've ended up with a higher level of public spending. >> when you talk it weakness in sterling, what is hsbc saying -- >> against 1.8150. not a huge fall but sterling is one of the weakest of the -- generally soft currencies over the next few months. >> before you go, let's move away from the u.k. just give us your -- your general view of how 2013's going to shape out on a global economy. >> it's a great rotation in the sense that i think we'll see a d
coming in stronger in the real star here. the euro topping 135 for the first time since april 2010. and strengthening even more after the gdp release. overnight in iasia, the nikkei p from 2010. the road map starts with the markets. today may be the day some milestones are hit. we're just about 2% away from dow 14,000. a level we have not traded above since october 17th, 2007. the s&p 500 less than 4% below its october '07 record high. can the bulls overcome the news of the surprise contraction in gdp. >> anticipation building, at least certainly here for research in motion. that being the blackberry 10, will it be enough to sustain the run. we'll take a look. >> amazon shares rocketing higher this morning. investors looking past the revenue and weak guidance, focusing instead on the gains in operating in gross margins. shares are set to open at record highs. >> look at chesapeakchesapeake,d of directors announcing the founder retiring in april. >> we do begin with a stunning gdp report. the economy contracted to 0.1% in the fourth quarter. first decline since 2009. this as we rema
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 75 (some duplicates have been removed)